Dietary calcium does not interact with vitamin D3 in terms of determining the response and catabolism of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D during winter in older adults

Kevin D. Cashman, Aoife Hayes, Sinead M. O'Donovan, Joy Y. Zhang, Michael Kinsella, Karen Galvin, Mairead Kiely, Kelly M. Seamans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Interactions between calcium and vitamin D may have implications for the regulation of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and its catabolism and, consequently, the vitamin D dietary requirement. Objective: We investigated whether different calcium intakes influenced serum 25(OH)D and indexes of vitamin D activation and catabolism during winter and in the context of both adequate and inadequate vitamin D intakes. Design: A 15-wk winter-based, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind vitamin D3 intervention (20 mg/d) study was carried out in free-living men and women aged ≤50 y (n = 125) who were stratified according to calcium intakes [moderate-low (<700 mg/d) or high (>1000 mg/d) intake]. The serum 25(OH)D concentration was the primary outcome, and serum calcium, parathyroid hormone (PTH), 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [24,25(OH)2D], the ratio of 24,25(OH)2D to 25(OH)D, vitamin D-binding protein, and free 25(OH)D were exploratory outcomes. Results: A repeated-measures ANOVA showed there was no significant (P = 0.2) time 3 vitamin D treatment 3 calcium intake grouping interaction effect on the mean serum 25(OH)D concentration over the 15-wk intervention period. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations increased (P ≤ 0.005) and decreased (P ≤ 0.002) in vitamin D3 and placebo groups, respectively, and were of similar magnitudes in subjects with calcium intakes <700 mg/d (and even <550 mg/d) compared with >1000 mg/d. The response of serum PTH, 1,25(OH)2D, 24,25(OH)2D, the ratio of 24,25(OH)2D to 25(OH)D, and free 25(OH)D significantly differed in vitamin D3 and placebo groups but not by calcium intake grouping. Conclusions: We found no evidence of a vitamin D sparing effect of high calcium intake, which has been referred to by some authors as "vitamin D economy." Thus, recent dietary vitamin D requirement estimates will cover the vitamin D needs of even those individuals who have inadequate calcium intakes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01990872.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1414-1423
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume99
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01 Jun 2014
Externally publishedYes

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