Impact of reader antenna polarisation, distance, inlay design, conveyor speed, tag location and orientation on the coupling of UHF RFID as applied to modified atmosphere packaged meat

Ultan Mc Carthy, Gashaw Ayalew, Francis Butler, Kevin McDonnell, Shane Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Undetected RFID tags make the potential benefits of RFID unattainable. This study aimed to determine the most significant factors that affect RFID and particularly its application to the traceability of meat. Experimental parameters included five RFID tag inlays, two levels of conveyor speeds, five variations of beef sample and an empty container, 12 tags per test sample, three distances and two types of reader antenna polarisations. Tag detection rates were determined in three replicates per combination of test parameters. A GLM ANOVA was carried out on tag detection rate. In decreasing order of significance in terms of the effect on mean tag detection rate were distance, sample, inlay design, conveyor speed and reader antenna polarisation. Interaction of these factors also proved significant, in decreasing order of importance were reader antenna * inlay, sample type * distance, inlay * distance, sample type * inlay, sample type * reader antenna, distance * speed, sample type * speed and finally sample type * distance * speed. Linearly polarised antenna preformed better overall at detecting tags, with 63% mean detection rate compared with circularly polarised antenna with 57% mean detection rate. Varying the tag inlay resulted in mean detection rates of between 62% and 88%. Ideal transponder location on package was reader antenna polarisation dependent, but generally tags facing reader antennas exhibited better detection rate. Results revealed that the under side of the package was the most un-detectable transponder location, considering the placement of reader antennas on top, left and right sides of the sample. Conveyor speed also proved significant with a variation from 0.5 to 1.0 m/s resulting in an average detection rate ranging from 62% to 57%, respectively. Circularly polarised antennas are believed to perform better in cases of random tag orientation on products. It can be concluded that RFID systems implementation in the meat supply chain requires a holistic approach where distances, polarisations, inlay type, meat composition and conveyor speed need to be considered.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)135-141
Number of pages7
JournalComputers and Electronics in Agriculture
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Coupling
  • Inlay design
  • Reader antenna polarisation
  • Ultra high frequency radio frequency identification

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Impact of reader antenna polarisation, distance, inlay design, conveyor speed, tag location and orientation on the coupling of UHF RFID as applied to modified atmosphere packaged meat'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this