Positioning of emotional intelligence skills within the overall skillset of practice-based accountants: employer and graduate requirements

Peggy Coady, Seán Byrne, John Casey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper presents evidence of employer and graduate attitudes on the skill set requirements for professional accountants, and whether university accounting programs develop these skills, and in particular emotional intelligence (EI) skills. We use priority indices and strategic mapping to evaluate the positioning of 31 skills. This analysis suggests that university accounting programs could consider increasing the emphasis placed on particular EI and non-emotional intelligence (non-EI) skills while other skills could be de-emphasised. While non-EI skills were ranked higher than EI skills, some non-EI skills are considered well developed in graduates and others are viewed as important but not well developed. While employers expect correspondence between the skills seen as important in the workplace and their expected development in university, there was also reverse correspondence in that employers do not expect universities to develop skills considered less important in the workplace.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-120
Number of pages27
JournalAccounting Education
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Accounting education
  • emotional intelligence
  • neo-correspondence theory
  • non-technical skills

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