Stem cell-derived enteroid cultures as a tool for dissecting host-parasite interactions in the small intestinal epithelium

Miriam F. Hares, Ellen Alana Tiffney, Luke J. Johnston, Lisa Luu, Christopher J. Stewart, Robin J. Flynn, Janine L. Coombes

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. can cause devastating pathological effects in humans and livestock, and in particular to young or immunocompromised individuals. The current treatment plans for these enteric parasites are limited due to long drug courses, severe side effects or simply a lack of efficacy. The study of the early interactions between the parasites and the site of infection in the small intestinal epithelium has been thwarted by the lack of accessible, physiologically relevant and species-specific models. Increasingly, 3D stem cell-derived enteroid models are being refined and developed into sophisticated models of infectious disease. In this review, we shall illustrate the use of enteroids to spearhead research into enteric parasitic infections, bridging the gap between cell line cultures and in vivo experiments.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12765
JournalParasite Immunology
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • apicomplexan
  • Cryptosporidium parvum
  • enteroid
  • intestinal epithelium
  • Neospora caninum
  • organoid
  • Toxoplasma gondii

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