Trust-terms ontology for defining security requirements and metrics

Kieran Sullivan, Jim Clarke, Barry P. Mulcahy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Security and privacy, accountability and anonymity, transparency and unobservability: these terms and more are vital elements for defining the overall security requirements - -and, thus, security measurability criteria - -of systems. However, these distinct yet related concepts are often substituted for one another in our discussions on securing trustworthy systems and services. This is damaging since it leads to imprecise security and trust requirements. Consequently, this results in poorly defined metrics for evaluating system security. This paper proposes a trust-terms ontology, which maps out and defines the various components and concepts that comprise ICT security and trust. We can use this ontology tool to gain a better understanding of their trust and security requirements and, hence, to identify more precise measurability criteria.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication4th European Conference on Software Architecture
Subtitle of host publicationDoctoral Symposium, Industrial Track and Workshops, ECSA 2010 Proceedings - Companion Volume
Pages175-180
Number of pages6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Event4th European Conference on Software Architecture: Doctoral Symposium, Industrial Track and Workshops, ECSA 2010 - Copenhagen, Denmark
Duration: 23 Aug 201026 Aug 2010

Publication series

NameACM International Conference Proceeding Series

Conference

Conference4th European Conference on Software Architecture: Doctoral Symposium, Industrial Track and Workshops, ECSA 2010
Country/TerritoryDenmark
CityCopenhagen
Period23/08/201026/08/2010

Keywords

  • metrics
  • ontologies
  • privacy
  • requirements
  • security
  • trust

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